• Industrially validating longitudinal static and dynamic analyses

    R. Holmes, D. Notkin, and M. Hancock, “Industrially validating longitudinal static and dynamic analyses,” in Proc. USER 2012 – workshop in conjuction with the ICSI 2012, 2012, pp. 43-44.

    @InProceedings{holmes:2012:venn,
    author = {Reid Holmes and David Notkin and Mark Hancock},
    title = {Industrially validating longitudinal static and dynamic analyses},
    booktitle = {Proc. USER 2012 - workshop in conjuction with the ICSI 2012},
    year = {2012},
    pages={43 -44},
    abstract={Software systems gradually evolve over time, becoming increasingly difficult to understand as new features are added and old defects are repaired. Some modifications are harder to understand than others; e.g., an explicit method call is usually easy to trace in the source code, while a reflective method call may perplex both developers and analysis tools. Our tool, the Inconsistency Inspector, collects static and dynamic call graphs of systems and composes them to help developers more systematically address the static and dynamic implications of a change to a system.},
    doi={http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/USER.2012.6226582},
    pdf={holmes-venn.pdf},
    subtype = {other}
    }


    Abstract

    Software systems gradually evolve over time, becoming increasingly difficult to understand as new features are added and old defects are repaired. Some modifications are harder to understand than others; e.g., an explicit method call is usually easy to trace in the source code, while a reflective method call may perplex both developers and analysis tools. Our tool, the Inconsistency Inspector, collects static and dynamic call graphs of systems and composes them to help developers more systematically address the static and dynamic implications of a change to a system.