tulip

Diane Watson is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Computer Science supervised by Mark Hancock at the University of Waterloo and Regan Mandryk at the University of Saskatchewan. Her focus is on gamification, in particular, how positive behaviours can be encouraged through games. She has been involved in the design of several games, including Reading Garden, an educational games that encourages students to participate in self-study activities such as reading the text book; and Vortex Mountain, an educational exergame that combines in-classroom learning with short bursts of exercise. She is heavily involved in the Games Institute at the University of Waterloo.

Diane did her Masters at the University of Saskatchewan in the Interaction Lab. Her thesis work looked at how we could predict the music that people choose to listen to based on their listening context (e.g., who they are with, what they are doing, and what they are feeling).

For more information and a complete list of publications please visit: DianeWatson.net


Projects

 

Publications

2016

  • R. R. Wehbe, D. K. Watson, G. F. Tondello, M. Ganaba, M. Stocco, A. Lee, and L. E. Nacke, ABOVE WATER: An Educational Game for Anxiety, in Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts, New York, NY, USA, 2016, pp. 79-84.
    @inproceedings{Wehbe:2016:AWE:2968120.2971804, author = {Wehbe, Rina R. and Watson, Diane K. and Tondello, Gustavo F. and Ganaba, Marim and Stocco, Melissa and Lee, Alvin and Nacke, Lennart E.}, title = {ABOVE WATER: An Educational Game for Anxiety}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion Extended Abstracts}, series = {CHI PLAY Companion '16}, year = {2016}, isbn = {978-1-4503-4458-6}, location = {Austin, Texas, USA}, pages = {79--84}, numpages = {6}, url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2968120.2971804}, doi = {10.1145/2968120.2971804}, acmid = {2971804}, publisher = {ACM}, address = {New York, NY, USA}, keywords = {games for health, mental health, psychology}, }

2014

  • V. Cheung, D. Watson, J. Vermeulen, M. Hancock, and S. Scott, Overcoming Interaction Barriers in Large Public Displays Using Personal Devices, in Extended Abtracts of the Ninth ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces, New York, NY, USA, 2014, pp. 375-380.
    @inproceedings{Cheung:2014:OIB:2669485.2669549,
    author = {Cheung, Victor and Watson, Diane and Vermeulen, Jo and Hancock, Mark and Scott, Stacey},
    title = {Overcoming Interaction Barriers in Large Public Displays Using Personal Devices},
    booktitle = {Extended Abtracts of the Ninth ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces},
    series = {ITS '14},
    year = {2014},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-2587-5},
    location = {Dresden, Germany},
    pages = {375--380},
    numpages = {6},
    url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2669485.2669549},
    doi = {10.1145/2669485.2669549},
    acmid = {2669549},
    publisher = {ACM},
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    keywords = {interaction design, large interactive displays, personal devices},
    }

  • D. Watson, D. Valtchanov, M. Hancock, and R. Mandryk, Designing a Gameful System to Support the Collection, Curation, Exploration, and Sharing of Sports Memorabilia, in Extended Abtracts of the First ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-human Interaction in Play, New York, NY, USA, 2014, pp. 451-452.
    @inproceedings{Watson:2014:DGS:2658537.2661322,
    author = {Watson, Diane and Valtchanov, Deltcho and Hancock, Mark and Mandryk, Regan},
    title = {Designing a Gameful System to Support the Collection, Curation, Exploration, and Sharing of Sports Memorabilia},
    booktitle = {Extended Abtracts of the First ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-human Interaction in Play},
    series = {CHI PLAY '14},
    year = {2014},
    isbn = {978-1-4503-3014-5},
    location = {Toronto, Ontario, Canada},
    pages = {451--452},
    numpages = {2},
    url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2658537.2661322},
    doi = {10.1145/2658537.2661322},
    acmid = {2661322},
    publisher = {ACM},
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    keywords = {collectors, gameful design, gamification, hockey},
    }

2013

  • D. Watson, R. Mandryk, and K. Stanley, The Design and Evaluation of a Classroom Exergame, in Gamification 2013, 2013, pp. 34-41.

    Balancing academic, physical and emotional needs of students while maintaining student interest is increasingly challenging in the resource constrained environments of the modern classroom. To answer this need we created and evaluated an exergame system called Vortex Mountain, which leverages the physical benefits of exercise and the motivational benefits of educational games to provide a healthy and engaging classroom activity for middle school students. Through a controlled study, we demonstrate that our classroom exergame provides similar affective, engagement, and learning benefits to an exercise or game intervention, while leveraging the valuable ancillary benefits of each. Thus, we believe that exergames have a future in the modern classroom and possess significant potential for future technical and pedagogical research.

    @InProceedings{watson:2013:vortexMountain,
    author = {Diane Watson and Regan Mandryk and Kevin Stanley},
    title = {The Design and Evaluation of a Classroom Exergame},
    booktitle = {Gamification 2013},
    year = {2013},
    abstract = {Balancing academic, physical and emotional needs of students while maintaining student interest is increasingly challenging in the resource constrained environments of the modern classroom. To answer this need we created and evaluated an exergame system called Vortex Mountain, which leverages the physical benefits of exercise and the motivational benefits of educational games to provide a healthy and engaging classroom activity for middle school students. Through a controlled study, we demonstrate that our classroom exergame provides similar affective, engagement, and learning benefits to an exercise or game intervention, while leveraging the valuable ancillary benefits of each. Thus, we believe that exergames have a future in the modern classroom and possess significant potential for future technical and pedagogical research. },
    pages = {34-41},
    pdf = {VortexMountain.pdf},
    subtype = {conference}
    }

  • D. Watson, R. Mandryk, and K. Stanley, The Design and Evaluation of a Classroom Exergame, in Gamification 2013, 2013, pp. 34-41.

    Balancing academic, physical and emotional needs of students while maintaining student interest is increasingly challenging in the resource constrained environments of the modern classroom. To answer this need we created and evaluated an exergame system called Vortex Mountain, which leverages the physical benefits of exercise and the motivational benefits of educational games to provide a healthy and engaging classroom activity for middle school students. Through a controlled study, we demonstrate that our classroom exergame provides similar affective, engagement, and learning benefits to an exercise or game intervention, while leveraging the valuable ancillary benefits of each. Thus, we believe that exergames have a future in the modern classroom and possess significant potential for future technical and pedagogical research.

    @InProceedings{watson:2013:vortexMountain,
    author = {Diane Watson and Regan Mandryk and Kevin Stanley},
    title = {The Design and Evaluation of a Classroom Exergame},
    booktitle = {Gamification 2013},
    year = {2013},
    abstract = {Balancing academic, physical and emotional needs of students while maintaining student interest is increasingly challenging in the resource constrained environments of the modern classroom. To answer this need we created and evaluated an exergame system called Vortex Mountain, which leverages the physical benefits of exercise and the motivational benefits of educational games to provide a healthy and engaging classroom activity for middle school students. Through a controlled study, we demonstrate that our classroom exergame provides similar affective, engagement, and learning benefits to an exercise or game intervention, while leveraging the valuable ancillary benefits of each. Thus, we believe that exergames have a future in the modern classroom and possess significant potential for future technical and pedagogical research. },
    pages = {34-41},
    pdf = {VortexMountain.pdf},
    subtype = {conference}
    }

  • D. Watson, M. Hancock, and R. Mandryk, Gamifying Behaviour that Leads to Learning, in Gamification 2013, 2013, pp. 87-90.

    Many courses require self-study to succeed. This is espe-cially true of online courses. However, self-study activities, such as reading the textbook and completing the associated workbook, are not motivating and do not contribute directly to grades. As a result many students do not complete these activities and this may lead to a lower understanding of the material and a lower overall grade in the class. In this paper we present the prototype of a casual game, Reading Garden, which encourages self-study through casual gameplay

    @InProceedings{watson:2013:readinggarden,
    author = {Diane Watson and Mark Hancock and Regan Mandryk},
    title = {Gamifying Behaviour that Leads to Learning},
    booktitle = {Gamification 2013},
    year = {2013},
    abstract = {Many courses require self-study to succeed. This is espe-cially true of online courses. However, self-study activities, such as reading the textbook and completing the associated workbook, are not motivating and do not contribute directly to grades. As a result many students do not complete these activities and this may lead to a lower understanding of the material and a lower overall grade in the class. In this paper we present the prototype of a casual game, Reading Garden, which encourages self-study through casual gameplay },
    pages = {87-90},
    pdf = {ReadingGarden.pdf},
    subtype = {conference}
    }

  • D. Watson, M. Hancock, R. Mandryk, and M. Birk, Deconstructing the Touch Experience, in In Proc ITS, St. Andrews, Scotland, 2013, pp. 199-208.

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance and experience differences between direct touch and mouse input on horizontal and vertical surfaces using a simple application and several validated scales. We find that, not only are both speed and accuracy improved when using the multi-touch display over a mouse, but that participants were happier and more engaged. They also felt more competent, in control, related to other people, and immersed. Surprisingly, these results cannot be explained by the intuitiveness of the controller, and the benefits of touch did not come at the expense of perceived workload. Our work shows the added value of considering experience in addition to traditional measures of performance, and demonstrates an effective and efficient method for gathering experience during inter-action with surface applications. We conclude by discussing how an understanding of this experience can help in designing touch applications.

    @InProceedings{watson:2013:touchexperience,
    author = {Diane Watson and Mark Hancock and Regan Mandryk and Max Birk},
    title = {Deconstructing the Touch Experience},
    booktitle = {In Proc ITS},
    year = {2013},
    abstract = {In this paper, we evaluate the performance and experience differences between direct touch and mouse input on horizontal and vertical surfaces using a simple application and several validated scales. We find that, not only are both speed and accuracy improved when using the multi-touch display over a mouse, but that participants were happier and more engaged. They also felt more competent, in control, related to other people, and immersed. Surprisingly, these results cannot be explained by the intuitiveness of the controller, and the benefits of touch did not come at the expense of perceived workload. Our work shows the added value of considering experience in addition to traditional measures of performance, and demonstrates an effective and efficient method for gathering experience during inter-action with surface applications. We conclude by discussing how an understanding of this experience can help in designing touch applications. },
    year = {2013},
    address = {St. Andrews, Scotland},
    pages = {199-208},
    pdf = {touchexperience.pdf},
    doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2512349.2512819},
    subtype = {conference}
    }

Diane Watson
UW Touchlab