Cayley MacArthur


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Cayley MacArthur is a PhD student supervised by Mark Hancock in Systems Design Engineering. Her interest in human-computer interaction began as an undergraduate in the Bachelor of Knowledge Integration program where she explored the intersection of rhetoric, semiotics and the user experience design process. As an MA student in the English department, she worked with Neil Randall and became a member of the Games Institute before pursuing a joint program with Systems Design Engineering co-supervised by Dr. Hancock, allowing for deeper integration of feminist and linguistic theory with research in the HCI field.

Projects

 

Publications

2016

  • C. MacArthur, S. Trothen, and M. Hancock, Tunnel Divisions: Interactive Sound Mapping of Transitory Public Spaces, in Proceedings of the 2016 ACM on Interactive Surfaces and Spaces, New York, NY, USA, 2016, pp. 493-496.

    We present Tunnel Divisions, an interactive musical installation designed for ephemeral interaction in public spaces. Informed by concepts from cultural and media studies along with existing literature on interactive public displays, we designed the installation as an intervention meant for the monotonous parts of everyday life. Our demonstration uses low-cost sensors and musical theory to create a generative sound composition unique to the particular space and the people moving through it. By experiencing the installation, we hope to promote critical thinking about the nature and form of interaction with public spaces.

    @inproceedings{MacArthur:2016:TDI:2992154.2996881, author = {MacArthur, Cayley and Trothen, Stephen and Hancock, Mark}, title = {Tunnel Divisions: Interactive Sound Mapping of Transitory Public Spaces}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 ACM on Interactive Surfaces and Spaces}, series = {ISS '16}, year = {2016}, isbn = {978-1-4503-4248-3}, location = {Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada}, pages = {493--496}, numpages = {4}, doi = {10.1145/2992154.2996881}, acmid = {2996881}, publisher = {ACM}, address = {New York, NY, USA}, keywords = {critical making, data phonolization, generative, movement, music, non-places, public spaces, sound, tunnels}, abstract = {We present Tunnel Divisions, an interactive musical installation designed for ephemeral interaction in public spaces. Informed by concepts from cultural and media studies along with existing literature on interactive public displays, we designed the installation as an intervention meant for the monotonous parts of everyday life. Our demonstration uses low-cost sensors and musical theory to create a generative sound composition unique to the particular space and the people moving through it. By experiencing the installation, we hope to promote critical thinking about the nature and form of interaction with public spaces.} }

2015

  • A. Bradley, C. MacArthur, M. Hancock, and S. Carpendale, Gendered or Neutral? Considering the Language of HCI, in Proc. GI, Toronto, Ont., Canada, Canada, 2015, pp. 163-170.

    In this paper, we present a Mechanical Turk study that explores how the most common words that have been used to refer to people in recent HCI literature are received by non-experts. The top five CHI 2014 people words are: user, participant, person, designer, and researcher. We asked participants to think about one of these words for ten seconds and then to draw an image of it. After the drawing was done we asked simple demographic questions about both the participant and the created image. Our results show that while generally our participants did perceive most of these words as predominately male, there were two notable exceptions. Women appear to perceive the terms "person" and "participant" as gender neutral. That is, they were just as likely to draw a person or a participant as male or female. So while these two words are not exactly gender neutral in that men largely perceived them as male, at least women did not appear to feel excluded by these terms. We offer an increased understanding of the perception of HCIs people words and discuss the challenges this poses to our community in striving toward gender inclusiveness.

    @inproceedings{Bradley:2015:Users,
    author = {Adam Bradley and Cayley MacArthur and Mark Hancock and Sheelagh Carpendale},
    title = {Gendered or Neutral? Considering the Language of {HCI}},
    booktitle = {Proc. GI},
    series = {GI '15},
    year = {2015},
    location = {Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada},
    pages = {163--170},
    publisher = {Canadian Information Processing Society},
    address = {Toronto, Ont., Canada, Canada},
    abstract={In this paper, we present a Mechanical Turk study that explores how the most common words that have been used to refer to people in recent HCI literature are received by non-experts. The top five CHI 2014 people words are: user, participant, person, designer, and researcher. We asked participants to think about one of these words for ten seconds and then to draw an image of it. After the drawing was done we asked simple demographic questions about both the participant and the created image. Our results show that while generally our participants did perceive most of these words as predominately male, there were two notable exceptions. Women appear to perceive the terms "person" and "participant" as gender neutral. That is, they were just as likely to draw a person or a participant as male or female. So while these two words are not exactly gender neutral in that men largely perceived them as male, at least women did not appear to feel excluded by these terms. We offer an increased understanding of the perception of HCIs people words and discuss the challenges this poses to our community in striving toward gender inclusiveness.},
    pdf={gi2015-gendered-language.pdf},
    subtype={conference}
    }

Cayley MacArthur
UW Touchlab